railroad

A Year Away

by Steve Eshom on September 13, 2014

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One year ago Friday I was on a railroad photography expedition in Vader, WA with some good friends. As you saw on dogcaught.com this was a visit to record action under the soon to disappear cantilever signals. It was a busy night and we enjoyed all sorts of trains to photograph with the signals.

As it ends up these photographs were my last.

17 days after this expedition my wife was diagnosed with breast cancer. As you saw in a post I chose to take a break from railroad photography so I could focus on my wife’s treatment. With changed priorities I chose to set some of my hobbies aside.

That was a tough choice but I felt my commitment to her was the most important thing. I still escaped on most Sundays for rail fanning around town with my daughter. Heck, we even made it out the Sunday after Tammy’s surgery. I used my iPhone periodically to photograph interesting things but for the most part this period was photography free. Thanks to Facebook and my great railfan friends I kept up on the happenings around the area.

Skip ahead one year. Today Tammy feels wonderful. She recovered from chemo, surgery and radiation and as a far as I’m concerned is back to normal. She feels occasional aches and pains but they are minor. She’s healthy and cancer free so I feel like the mission is accomplished!

I haven’t recovered my photography interest though. I’m not sure why but the idea of enjoying life through the viewfinder isn’t as appealing as it once was. I know that having a health issue refocuses your creativity. She and I spent lots of time problem solving and planning which used all the creativity we could muster. The result? My creativity feels exhausted. My motivation is lost.

For now I will continue my hiatus from photography. I do plan to enjoy railfanning and hanging out with railfan friends since my interest in trains and railroading hasn’t waned at all. When my motivation and creativity return I will once again drag my camera along.

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It Takes People To Run A Train

by Steve Eshom on July 9, 2013

This entry is part 5 of 6 in the series CMR Photo Freight 2013

We as railfans tend to get caught up with railroad equipment, history, rivets, and other non-human aspects of railroading.  The honest truth is trains move because of the people behind them.  The excursion I rode on the Central Montana is no different.  Without Carla, Kristi, AJ, Alan, and many others we wouldn’t have turned a wheel.

Engineer Carla

 General Manager, lobbyist, and engineer are just a few of the titles CMR’s Carla Allen holds.  On our spring excursion she did a little of each.

Running around in a couple of 1950’s era GP9’s means problems can happen.  Sure enough when we stopped at Danvers to get the power around to the other end of the train both locomotives wouldn’t load.  With a single ended siding we needed both units move the train around.  Initially Carla and Kristi worked on the issue but soon AJ and Alan were involved.  After 30 minutes of trying different things AJ and Alan popped open a cabinet and started hunting around for the issue.  Soon they discovered a balky relay which stuck in the wrong position and prevented loading.  A quick tap of a flag stick put it back in the right spot and we were in business again.  Without the right people it would have been a long walk back to Denton!

Denton Nights

Our troubleshooters AJ (left) and Alan (right) work to determine which balky relay they need to give a nudge.

With only an engineer and conductor the switching moves at Danvers would have been a challenge.  Thankfully we had a couple of additional railroaders on the excursion and they pitched in to facilitate the work.  After a quick job briefing Alan and AJ teamed up with Kristi and Carla to move the power to the other end of the train.  Without their willingness to volunteer the run around move sure would have taken longer.

AJ

AJ Shewan make a joint between our caboose and a flat car.

As you can see people make it happen, even when it is a simple excursion train…

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Sage Creek

by Steve Eshom on July 2, 2013

This entry is part 4 of 6 in the series CMR Photo Freight 2013

As railfans know there are a few iconic locations where rail lines, scenery, and structures converge into unprecedented scenes.  For the Central Montana this iconic location falls beween the Hoosac tunnel and the Danvers elevators.  It is a bit of a remote spot where nothing more than a few rattlesnakes and cattle live.  Its name is Sage Creek.  The highlights of this location are of course the 1700′ long Sage Creek trestle and the nearly two mile long sweeping S curve on either side.  Add in Montana’s “Big Sky” and this spot unbeatable.

Arriving Sage Creek

 

The eastbound excursion train descends the 1% grade from Hoosac tunnel towards Sage Creek.

On the south side of Sage Creek mother nature built a viewing platform to end all platforms.  The hills which define the canyon are covered only in grass and are easy to negotiate for an ideal photographic position.  No matter what your taste I think you can find a spot on that hill which will make you smile.  For our excursion Jay and Carla worked together to put the train in various spots so everyone could have that perfect photo.

Sage Creek

Our excursion train parks in the middle of one of the beautiful railroad scenes in Montana.

On the return to Denton we stopped on the north side of the trestle for another photo shoot.  This time we set up much closer to the trestle which gives you the idea just how big it really is.

Sage Creek

Our excursion train is dwarfed by the massive Sage Creek trestle.

With a scene as giant as the S curve and trestle at Sage Creek I think  a 110 car grain train would be much more appropriate for an excursion.

 

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An Old Ford and a Couple of Chevys

by Steve Eshom on June 27, 2013

This entry is part 3 of 6 in the series CMR Photo Freight 2013

East of Denton we first stopped at a hill that provides a great view of a curve with Square Butte in the background.  This ended up being one spot where a much longer train would be just ideal.  Don’t get me wrong, having any train at this spot in 2013 makes it special so I cherished seeing our little excursion train round the bend and come into view.

Square Butte CurveEast of Denton, MT our little excursion train rounds a curve with the famous Square Butte looking over the scene.

Our next stop was a rural grade crossing near the community of Hoosac.  Here Jay and Carla arranged for a local gentleman to bring his 40’s era Ford pick up in for a photo shoot with the train.  The first set up was staged for Camron’s video.  The pickup drove slowly down the road while the train approached the crossing just ahead of it.  After that we parked the pickup around the crossing for us still photographers to get a few photos.  The old Ford looked great and worked well with our ’50s era Chevys.

A Ford and a Couple of Chevys

A Ford and a Couple of Chevy’s near Hoosac, MT. 

Most railfans have heard of the Hoosac tunnel and most probably think it is in Massachusetts.  Central Montana railfans recognize Hoosac tunnel is actually located in Montana.  After our photo shoot with the Ford we continued east and passed through the Montana version of the tunnel.  On the east end we stopped for another photo shoot of with the train exiting the tunnel.

East Hoosac

From the cupola of the CMR caboose the Sage Creek valley comes into view framed by the Hoosac tunnel.

Exiting Hoosac

Thanks to the recent rains all the hills around the Hoosac tunnel are very green.

Next up, the unparalleled vistas of Sage Creek.

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Diminutive

by Steve Eshom on April 17, 2013

Constant change is the rule in Vancouver.  Last week when I visited the depot looking down the alley next to the Great Western Malting elevator was nearly impossible.  The scrapper near the depot had piles of scrap and equipment which blocked the view.  The next week rail cars blocked the way.  This week construction had moved moved the scrap out of away so for the first time in several years I was able to capture an image of Great Western’s plant switcher.

The Port of Vancouver renewed the track recently so concrete ties, fresh ballast. and a renewed surface now replace the track which previously was pretty rough.  A new set of automatic switches with switch indicators control the crossover between the tracks.   Instead of just 6 cars they now pull 12 to dump.   All good changes to improve the flow of business.

The fact remains though that the building structures still tower over the trains here.  Despite all of the changes, the trains remain diminutive.

I’ve been away from blogging for a bit.  Over the last month or so I’ve worked on several personal photography projects and have just taken a break.  As time permits and my projects wrap up I will certainly be posting again.

Diminutive

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